September 2015


‘Aferim!,’ an Oscar Contender, Explores the Enslavement of the Roma

New York Times

BUCHAREST, Romania — The slow black-and-white scenes in which two horsemen ride through vast, bleak landscapes in Radu Jude’s latest movie, “Aferim!,” could have come straight out of a classic American western, as could the central theme of injustice. Yet the movie is set in 19th-century Wallachia, part of modern-day Romania, where for almost 500 years ending in 1856, the Roma (or Gypsies, as they have been more commonly known) were viewed as property to be bought and sold. Full article.


August 2015


Kumbh Mela Book Launch in Deli

Harvard South Asia Institute

On Monday, August 17, the Harvard South Asia Institute launched the Kumbh Mela: Mapping the Ephemeral Megacity book and exhibition in Delhi, India. Shri Akhilesh Yadav, Honorable Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh, was on hand to launch the book with Harvard faculty, to a crowd of over 250 people at the Oberoi Hotel. Full article.



At a Mass Pilgrimage in India, a New Effort to Track Disease in Real Time

Global Post

NASHIK, India — A wide-angle photograph hangs in the lobby of my hotel in this ancient city in western India. It’s of Nashik at night during a religious festival called the Kumbh Mela, surrounded by hills, with brightly lit streets, houses and temples. Full article.


May 2015


Celebrating Romani Resistance Day

Foreign Policy in Focus

A growing movement among Roma activists looks to celebrate their ancestors’ resistance to persecution — and to pick up where they left off. Full article.


Following Earthquakes, Building a More Resilient Nepal

Harvard TH Chan News

Like others before him, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health student Kai Hsiao, MPH ’15, predicted that a major earthquake in Nepal was inevitable, and that the health care needs in the aftermath of such a disaster would be overwhelming. Full article.


April 2015


Why We Should Care About Adoption Rehoming

Social Work Helper

“A sick thing”. “Human trafficking in children”. “A gaping loophole with life threatening outcomes”. These are just few of the ways experts, legislators and judges have named unregulated private transfers of child custody, a practice referred to as re-homing. Full article.


After Nepal Quake, Harvard Responds

Harvard Gazette

With Nepal struggling to deal with the enormous calamity caused by the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck north of Kathmandu Saturday, Harvard is mobilizing to help with technical and medical assistance and reaching out to faculty, staff, and students visiting the region. Full article.


A Powerful Convergence: Students, Researchers, Share Lessons from Kumbh Mela

Harvard Gazette

Every 12 years, where the Ganges meets the Yamuna River in Allahabad, India, a city of millions appears, made entirely of just six things: canvas, corrugated metal, bamboo, nails, screws, and rope. Full article.


Arkansas Becomes Fifth State to Regulate Re-Homing…

The Chronicle of Social Change

The little girl was only five years old when her adoptive parents decided she had to leave. Disillusioned by what they saw as an adoption gone awry, they gave the child away to a friend, bypassing child welfare authorities. Full article.


UNICEF Child Protection Chief at Harvard Chan School

US Fund for UNICEF

Last Friday, Susan Bissell, UNICEF’s chief of child protection, spoke to a room teeming with students from the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, the Harvard Kennedy School, the Harvard Law School, the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.. Full article


March 2015


A Siren Call to Action

Harvard Gazette

How and why the Islamic State is finding avid converts among the West’s middle class. With FXB Fellow Jessica Stern. Full article


India’s Bonded Labourers: One Brick at a Time

The Economist

“MANY of India’s “modern slaves” labour in appalling conditions in brick kilns or breaking stones in quarries…”


January 2015


The Syrian Refugee Crisis

New York Times

Letter to the Editor by FXB fellows Josyann Abisaab, Satchit Balsari, and Kathleen Hamill

G. Beals/UNHCR